Mr. Hubby is more Malaysianized than I thought!

Last week, I shared some phrases Mr. Hubby uses all the time in Malaysia. You can click here to read the post. Even though we’re in Bulgaria now, he still uses these phrases frequently. And, he is using more Manglish than I thought! Like, seriously?!

Today, I’m going to share with you 10 more phrases/words that Mr. Hubby loves using all the time, even when he’s in Bulgaria. I think the major reason why he likes using Manglish phrases here in Bulgaria (as a weapon against his friends) is because his friends don’t know how to retaliate. By sharing this and the previous post, I hope Mr. Hubby’s friends can understand what is he talking about. You can also have fun by attacking Mr. Hubby with these phrases/words. Haha, fun attack I mean. 😀

1. Ham sap
What it is: Ham sap (a Cantonese/Chinese dialect phrase that means perverted or dirty-minded)
What it means: Perverted or dirty-minded (we usually use it in a joking manner)
Where did he learn it: Definitely from me, especially when guys checked on me when I’m wearing short pants or short skirt.
Sample sentence and what it means: Walao, that guy is super hamsap! (Yikes, that guy is very perverted!)

2. Bo jio
What it is: Bo (a Hokkien/Chinese dialect word for no) +  jio (a Hokkien/Chinese dialect word for ask)
What it means: You didn’t ask me to go with you. OR You didn’t invite me.
Where did he learn it: From my friends who constantly attack each other when one of them didn’t invite the others for some outings.
Sample sentence and what it means: Walao, why you bo jio? (Hey, why didn’t you invite me?)

3. Want to pengsan
What it is: Want + to + pengsan (a Malay word that means faint)
What it means: Literally, it means I want to faint but it doesn’t make sense because who chooses when to faint? It can be used as an indication of frustration or as an indication of being speechless or as an indication of the facepalm action. (Depending on different contexts)
Where did he learn it: From me, when someone annoys me (usually).
Sample sentence and what it means: Seriously, I want to pengsan! (Seriously, I’m speechless!)

4. Lao sai 
What it is: Lao sai (a Hokkien/Chinese dialect phrase for diarrhea)
What it means: Diarrhea
Where did he learn it: I have no idea! 😛
Sample sentence and what it means: Eeerr, don’t eat this, later you lao sai! (Yikes, don’t eat this. Later you’ll get diarrhea!)

5. Pantang larang 
What it is: Pantang larang (a Malay phrase that means taboo/taboos)
What it means: Taboos
Where did he learn it: From me, as a metaphor when somebody does something I dislike, not necessarily a taboo.
Sample sentence and what it means: Eeerr, I very pantang larang to see people write like shit. (Yikes, it is a taboo for me when people don’t write properly.)

6. Lai… (with draggy intonation) 
What it is: Lai (a Chinese word that means come)
What it means: Literally, it means come. It can also mean here you go or here it comes, especially when somebody is giving you something.
Where did he learn it: From a waitress in a cafe we frequently had our lunch at. Everytime when she was serving our food, the waitress would say “lai….”
Sample sentence and what it means: Lai… your coffee. (Here comes your coffee. OR Here is your coffee.)

7. Sayang 
What it is: Sayang (In Malay, it can be used as a noun that means love or sweetheart. Alternatively, it can be used to describe love or affection.)
What it means: To show love, care, concern, affection etc. Sometimes, the word is used together with the action of a gentle pat.
Where did he learn it: From my friend who goes by the initials SS.
Sample sentence and what it means: You must always sayang Jenny, ok? (You must always show love/concern/affection to Jenny, okay?)

8. Da bao (can be “da pao” or “ta pao”)
What it is: Da bao (a Chinese phrase that means takeaway)
What it means: To buy a takeaway meal. Occasionally, as a metaphor to give the meaning of “keeping all things and go away.”
Where did he learn it: From me, everytime I crave for my bubble tea.
Sample sentence and what it means: I’m lazy to eat out. Let’s da bao McD. (I’m lazy to eat out. Let’s get a McDonald’s takeaway.)

9. Don’t kacau me
What it is: Don’t + kacau (a Malay word that means disturb) + me
What it means: Don’t disturb me. Sometimes it can mean “don’t make fun of me”.
Where did he learn it: I have no idea. I don’t remember using this against him. Hmmmm…
Sample sentence and what it means: I’m playing Warcraft, don’t kacau me please! (I’m playing Warcraft. Please do not disturb me.)

10. Lao (+ the name of someone)
What it is: lao (a Chinese word that means old)
What it means: Old. However in this context, it doesn’t necessarily mean old. Usually the elders use this word together with the surname of their friends when they address each other. Nowadays, people from the younger generation use this word together with their friend’s surname to show close friendship or solidarity. Chinese surnames are usually one syllable, so it goes like this lao wang, lao chen, etc. However, Mr. Hubby’s friends’ surnames are usually more than one syllable, he usually uses the word lao together with their first names instead.
Where did he learn it: From my BFF’s husband’s friend. My BFF’s initials are CC. Hahaha…
Sample sentence and what it means: Hello, lao migger! (Hello, “old” Milen! – to show solidarity) 😀

I’m sure all these phrases or words are easily understood by my Malaysian friends but I’m sure my international friends will need some time to digest what is going on. Well, at least now you know what Mr. Hubby is talking about and you can use these phrases/words for future communication with him. Hahaha! 😀 By the way, if you’re interested to know how exactly he learnt all these phrases/words, you might want to ask him directly! 😀 😀 😀

Note: Some of these phrases/words may have more than one meaning. This list of phrases/words is solely based on the communication between Mr. Hubby and the author. 

If you have missed the first part, you can click here to read it!

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